Safety

Propane is a safe, economical fuel, but like other forms of energy it can be hazardous if not handled properly. Propane has an unusual odor, sort of like decayed cabbage, a dead mouse, garlic, or rotten eggs. Ask your delivery man to let you smell the gas. Learn to identify this odor now.
Leaking propane is heavier than air and without proper ventilation can collect in low places like basements, pits, on the floor, etc. If ignited, propane will burn or explode.

IF YOU SMELL GAS…

  • DON’T TOUCH electrical switches, light matches, or use the phone.
  • GET EVERYONE OUT of the building.
  • SHUT OFF the gas valve at the outside tank, meter, or service entrance.
  • CALL your gas supplier and/or the fire department from a neighbor’s phone.

IF PILOT LIGHT WON’T LIGHT…
(Read appliance operating instructions before attempting to light pilot).
Your pilot light is designed not to light if there is a problem. If you have trouble lighting the pilot or keeping it lit, there’s normally a safety feature preventing it from working. If it won’t light, shut off the gas and call your gas supplier.

TAMPERING IS DANGEROUS…
Do not force the gas control knob. Never use tools. Use only your hand to turn the control know. Forcing the gas control knob may override the safety features and allow gas to leak. This could result in a fire or explosion.

If the gas control knob becomes difficult to operate by hand, the control should be serviced by a trained gas service person.

GAS HAS BEEN ODORIZED…
Before lighting, sniff all around the appliance area far a gas odor. Be sure to sniff next to the floor because propane gas is heavier than air and may temporarily exist at floor level.

ABSORPTION…
LP Gas leaking from buried lines can lose its odor passing through soil; however, this depends on two factors. One is the type of soil and the second is the distance the gas travels through the soil.

If a leak is suspected, contact you gas supplier.

WATER DAMAGE…
If your gas control has been subjected to flooding or wetting, it must be replaced immediately by a trained gas service person.

“Information courtesy of the National Propane Gas Association, www.npga.org.”